March 2019

Boston, MA

Speaker Faculty

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Rick Horwtiz
Executive Director
Allen Institute for Cell Science

Rick Horwitz is the inaugural Executive Director of the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle. Previously, he was a University Professor and Harrison Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology at the University of Virginia. He also served as the Director of the Cell Migration Consortium: an NIH-funded multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary collaboration. Previously, he served as the Head of the nascent Department of Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of Illinois and was a Professor of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. Rick earned his B.A. in the Honors Program at UW Madison, majoring in chemistry (math, physics). He received his Ph.D. in Biophysics at Stanford University and did postdoctoral research in NMR at at UC Berkeley. He has served on numerous strategic planning, editorial and advisory committees and organized several international meetings. Rick is known for his pioneering and leadership roles in cell adhesion, migration, and live-cell imaging

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

14.00 | Welcome Presentation from the Allen Institute

Fyodor Urnov
Associate Director
Altius Institute for Biomedical Sciences

Fyodor Urnov, Ph.D., is Associate Director at the Altius Institute for Biomedical Sciences, where he shares broad responsibility for defining and leading the overall scientific effort. Prior to joining Altius, Dr Urnov was Vice President, Discovery and Translational Research, at Sangamo Therapeutics, where he co-developed human genome editing with engineered nucleases (2005), and then led the Company’s R&D efforts to deploy genome editing for crop trait engineering in partnership with Dow AgroSciences (2009), and co-managed Sangamo’s partnership with Sigma-Aldrich for the generation of engineered cell lines for manufacturing, transgenic animals and research reagents (2010). During 2010-16, he lead IND-enabling efforts on new disease indications, including  genome editing for the hemoglobinopathies (parnered with Biogen, IND accepted 2017), and allele-specific targeted gene regulation with engineered transcription factors for neurodegenerative disease (partnered with Pfizer). He is an author of more than 70 scientific publications and an inventor on more than 130 issued and pending U.S. patents related to genome editing and targeted gene regulation technology. Prior to joining Sangamo, Dr. Urnov was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health in the laboratory of Dr Alan P. Wolffe, where he trained in the study of chromatin-based genome regulatory processes in metazoa. Dr. Urnov received his Ph.D. in Biology from Brown University, where he studied chromatin-based integration of genome control in the laboratory of Dr Susan A. Gerbi, and his B.Sc. in Biology from Moscow State University, where he was a student in the Department of Virology led by Dr Joseph G. Atabekov.

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

10.40 | Genome Editing B.C.: Lasting Lessons From the “Old Testament”

Dirk Hockemeyer
Assistant Professor
Berkeley

The focus of my work is to establish reliable techniques that allow modeling of human diseases using genetically engineered human and stem cell and mouse models. As a principle investigator, I am leveraging my expertise in telomere biology, mouse genetics, human stem cell techniques and genome editing to elucidate the mechanism of telomerase regulation in human stem cells, upon their differentiation and during tumor formation. In addition, my research team seeks to understand the consequences of telomere shortening in adult stem cells and how this impacts tumor formation, stem cell renewal as well as cellular and organismal ageing. We address these questions using genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), as well as human adult stem cells, human organoid systems and genetic mouse models.

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

11.40 | Elucidating the Principles of Cancer Cell Immortality Using Genetically Defined Human Stem Cell Models

Jenny Shin
Jacob Corn’s Lab Postdoctoral Researcher
Jacob Corn’s Lab Innovative Genomics Institute UC Berkeley

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

11.55 | Gene Repair in Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

Ania Wronski
Field Application Scientist
Synthego

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

11.40 | Synthetic sgRNA Enables Highly Efficient & Consistent CRISPR Editing of Cells for Automation, Cell Engineering & Therapeutic Applications

Xin Jiang
Senior Research Scientist, Discovery Biology
Yumanity Therapeutics

Rhonda Newman
Senior Staff Scientist
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Workshop A

Tuesday 12th June, 2018

09.00 |
Practical Insights, Consideration, & Discussion for Optimizing Genome Editing of Stem Cells

Brock Roberts
Precise editing
Allen Institute for Cell Science

Stuart Chambers
Senior Scientist
Amgen

Amanda Haupt
RNP transfection and QC
Allen Institute for Cell Science

Tanya Grancharova
Design/ bioinformatics
Allen Institute for Cell Science

Martin Kampmann
Assistant Professor
UCSF

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

09.40 | Elucidating Disease Mechanisms & Therapeutic Targets in Human IPSC Models by CRISPR-Based Functional Genomics

Natasha Snider
Assistant Professor
UNC-Chapel Hill

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

10.10 | Combining Patient-Derived IPSCs & CRISPR Technology in Disease Modeling & Drug Discovery for Rare Genetic Disorders

Dane Hazelbaker
Research Scientist
Broad Institute

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

11.10 | A Scaled Framework for CRISPR Editing of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Study Psychiatric Disease

Kristin Baldwin
Professor
The Scripps Research Institute

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

16.30 | Haplotype Editing IPSCs to Demystify Human-Specific & Non-Coding Genomic Disease Risk loci

William Hendriks
Instructor
Massachusetts General Hospital

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

9.10 | Human IPSC-Based Disease Modeling Reveals a Retrotransposon With Repeat Expansion as the Causal Mechanism of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism

David Piper
Director, Research & Development
Thermo Fisher

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

09.30 | Eliminating Inherent Genome Editing Bottlenecks in IPSCs to Build Physiologically Relevant Disease Models

Kevin Holden
Head of Synthetic Biology
Synthego

Nelly Cruz
Research Scientist
University of Washington

Workshop C

Tuesday 12th June, 2018

15.00 |
Using CRISPR-Cas gene editing to generate cellular models of disease

Ru Gunawardane
Director, Stem Cells and Gene Editing
Allen Institute for Cell Science

Workshop A

Tuesday 12th June, 2018

09.00 |
Practical Insights, Consideration, & Discussion for Optimizing Genome Editing of Stem Cells

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

08.40 | Using CRISPR/Cas9 to Illuminate Stem Cell Organization & Dynamics

Rick Horwitz
Executive Director
Allen Institute for Cell Science

Bruce R. Conklin
Investigator
Gladstone Institutes & UCSF

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

11.10 | CRISPR & Stem Cells: Disease Mechanism & Genome Surgery

George Church
Professor
Harvard & MIT

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

14.30 | Genome & Epigenome Engineering in Organs & Organoids

Beno Freedman
Assistant Professor
University of Washington

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

13.25 | Using CRISPR to Illuminate Organs & Organoids

Jennifer Mitchell
Associate Professor
University of Toronto

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

15.00 | Enhancer Switching Regulates Sox2 During the Transition From Embryonic to Neural Stem Cells

Gene Yeo
Professor of Cellular & Molecular Medicine
UCSD

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

16.00 | Modulating RNA Diseases Using CRISPR/Cas Technology

Doug Oliver
Founder-Chair
Regenerative Medicine

Doug is a writer, editorial contributor, and patient advocate from Nashville, Tennessee. He holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of New England and has specialized in work on health care policy, compliance, and clinical case advocacy. He is also a stem cell patient. At age 32, he was diagnosed with macular degeneration, a disease that attacks the retina, causing blindness of central vision. Doug became legally blind at age 45. In August 2015, he underwent autologous bone-marrow stem cell therapy to both eyes, and regained much of his lost vision. He received his driver’s license 5 months later. Doug’s story has reached millions through international broadcasts, interviews with the national press, and countless affiliate television and news media outlets.

Workshop B

Tuesday 12th June, 2018

12.00 |
The Potential for CRISPR + Stem Cells to Help Patients Tame “The Wild West”

Day One

Wednesday, June 13th 2018

09.00 | When Science Needs The Power Of Story

Adriana Beltran
Director Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Core
UNC

Day Two

Thursday, June 14th 2018

13.55 | CRISPRing iPSCs to Efficiently Model Genetic Diseases